September 16, 2014 - 12:43 pm - Posted in Sports

volleyballNorthwestern College Libero Alexis Bart is this week’s GPAC/Hauff Mid-America Sports Volleyball Defensive Player-of-the-Week. Bart, a senior from Sheldon helped the Red Raiders to a 4-1 record on the week totaling 121 digs over five matches on the week. Bart averaged 5.5 digs per game for Northwestern and had a service reception of 94.0 percent. She also totaled five ace serves and was named to the Saints Invitational All-Tournament Team. Northwestern is 14-2 on the season.

Bart’s team mate, right side hitter Karlie Schut from West Des Moines is this week’s GPAC/Hauff Mid-America Sports Volleyball Player-of-the-Week. Schut, a junior, reached double digits in kills in four out of five matches on the week, including 14 kills in three matches. She also tied for the team lead with 12 aces and had 11 blocks.

Dordt College setter Kayla Bartman is this week’s GPAC/Hauff Mid-America Sports Volleyball Setter-of-the-Week. Bartman, a senior Sioux Center guided the Defenders to a pair of victories. In a 3-2 win over number 10 Grand View she dished out 39 assists, had 9 digs and 6 kills. She had another well rounded game against Briar Cliff, who was in the receiving vote’s category in the latest national poll. Barman finishing with 47 assists, 7 digs, 5 kills and 4 blocks as Dordt picked the 3-2 victory. The Defenders are now 7-5 overall on the season.

Iowa DNRThe Iowa deer hunting tradition will be passed on to about 10,000 youths who are participating in the youth deer hunting season, which opens on Sept. 20. This season provides an opportunity to teach deer hunting, wildlife behavior, and safe hunting practices to resident youths while they are under the watchful eye of a licensed adult.

For many young hunters, this will be their first experience hunting deer, and mentors are encouraged to take the needs of the new hunter into account when planning the hunt.

The goal of the hunt should be a positive, enjoyable, and ethical experience, and harvesting a deer should be considered a bonus, not define the success of the hunt.

The youth season coincides with the disabled hunter deer season for hunters who meet certain criteria.  Each season runs September 20 through October 5.

Each youth must be under direct supervision of an adult mentor, with a valid license and habitat fee (if required).  The youth license is valid statewide.

An unfilled youth season tag may be used during the early or late muzzleloader season or one of the two shotgun seasons only. That youth must follow all other rules specified for each season. However party hunting with a youth tag is not allowed. A deer must be harvested by the youth with the tag. However, that tag holder may obtain deer tags for other season, just as any other hunter can do.

The youth deer season usually has mild temperatures and biting insects.  Hunters should be prepared in case they youth harvests a deer by bringing bags of ice to cool the deer cavity and by having a locker that can accept the deer for processing.  Last year, more than 10,000 youth hunters reported harvesting 3,300 deer and nearly 300 disabled hunters reported harvesting 120 deer.

All deer taken must be reported using the harvest reporting system by midnight the day after the deer is recovered. Harvest reporting is a very important part of the deer management program in Iowa, playing a vital role in managing deer populations and hunting opportunities.  Hunters can report their deer on the DNR website at www.iowadnr.gov, by calling the toll free reporting number 1-800-771-4692, or at any license vendor.

September 16, 2014 - 12:10 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRWith Iowa’s bow season just days away, hunters are in the final stages of preparation; adjusting tree stand locations, cutting shooting lanes, or ‘just’ scouting those early season deer habits.

Tops in that preparation? Staying safe above the ground. Talking with bow hunters, it’s surprising how many have slipped, fallen or had to ‘jump’ the last few feet to the ground. Add to that, the fact that Iowa’s two hunting fatalities in the last two seasons involved not firearms, but bow hunters falling. With upwards of 50,000 of them in Iowa, it is a hazard that can be eliminated with a little forward thinking.

To play it safe, consider a couple staples.

“Bring friends when you install your tree stand,” urges Dave Giese, Hawkeye Wildlife Area shooting range officer in Johnson County. He recently coordinated an Archery Safety Day there. “Once up, make sure it gets anchored. Have a harness to raise your equipment. Don’t carry your bow up or down.”

Once on stand—your first move should be to secure your safety harness to the tree.

“A safety harness is an absolute necessity. You are just asking to fall out of a tree if you don’t have one,” warns Mark Powers, of Cedar Rapids, a 25-year bowhunter. “There are just too many situations where you’re moving your feet, moving your body, changing things around. You have to be safe.”

Basically, follow the ‘three point rule.’ Your hands are two points of contact. Your feet are two more. To safely climb, you need three points of contact.

Purchase a stand made by a supporting member company of the Treestand Manufacturers of America (TMA), and it includes a basic harness. In fact, safety harnesses—over each shoulder and adjusted at both thighs—are overshadowed now by safety jackets; easier to put on and which spread the pressure, should you fall. Some have a telescoping-type strap between you and the tree, which lessens fall impact or even lowers you to the ground.

“It’s the concept of ‘where are you most vulnerable?’ As bow hunting has become more popular, there are more products. Many are just, ‘Hey, this would solve that problem,’ thought up by bowhunters themselves,” explains Roger Mildenstein, longtime bowhunter and owner of Fin & Feather Outdoor Store in Iowa City. Among more recent safety features is a pair of heavy-duty plastic sleeves, over anchor spikes. By sliding the legs of a tree stand ladder into them, it creates a ground-based ‘hinge’ to easily set the stand into place.

Other products range from a lineman’s type belt, allowing you to lean back with your hands free to attach and climb sectional ladders…or a hoist to hold a stand in place as you strap it in. They become that ‘third point’ of contact; allowing you to tend to the details, when on high.

Probably the best safety advice? Communicate.

“Plan ahead. Let someone know where you are; what time you expect to be home, what stand you will be in that day,” urges Giese.  “If you do end up with an issue, people have an idea of where to look for you.”

 Youth, Disabled Hunter Seasons

Saturday will find thousands of young hunters in stands or posted along field edges or funnel points in the woods. As Iowa’s Youth Deer hunting season opens, a bow, shotgun or muzzleloader can be used…with the requirements specific to the season, such as blaze orange clothing. Last year, about 10,000 young hunters took part.

Each must be under direct supervision of an adult mentor, with a valid license and habitat fee (if required).  The youth license is valid statewide. Additionally, a couple hundred disabled hunters will be active across Iowa. Each season runs September 20 through October 5.

An unfilled youth season tag may be used during the early or late muzzleloader season or one of the two shotgun seasons ONLY. That youth must follow all other rules specified for each season. However party hunting with a youth tag is not allowed. A deer must be harvested by the youth with the tag. However, that tag holder may obtain deer tags for other season, just as any other hunter can do.

 

September 15, 2014 - 4:04 pm - Posted in Sports

naia_logo

KANSAS CITY, MO. – Grand View (Iowa) tops the first regular season edition of the 2014 NAIA Football Coaches’ Top 25 Poll, the national office announced Monday, September 15th. The Vikings, who are making their fourth-straight appearance at No. 1, were one-of-two teams to hold its position from the preseason poll, received all 15 first-place votes and 340 points.

Morningside (Iowa) claims the No. 2 position with 327 points. The Mustangs (2-0), who have now been ranked among the top 5 in 27-straight polls, have outscored their opponents 139-33 through two games, including an 83-19 win at Great Plains Athletic Conference rival Nebraska Wesleyan on Sept. 13. Morningside set a program single-game record in the win against the Prairie Wolves, accumulating 729 total yards to break the team’s former mark of 712. The Mustangs have their 2014 home opener on Saturday against Dordt (Iowa).

In the area teams, Northwestern College slipped 5 spots from #13 to number#18.

2014 NAIA Football Coaches’ Top 25 Poll – No. 1 (Sept. 15)
RANK LAST POLL SCHOOL (1ST PLACE VOTES) W L TOTAL POINTS
1 1 Grand View (Iowa) (15) 2 0 340
2 3 Morningside (Iowa) 2 0 327
3 5 Baker (Kan.) 2 0 314
4 8 Tabor (Kan.) 2 0 299
5 9 Rocky Mountain (Mont.) 3 0 277
6 10 Faulkner (Ala.) 3 0 276
7 2 Carroll (Mont.) 1 1 262
8 12 Georgetown (Ky.) 1 0 243
9 22 Southern Oregon 3 0 226
10 16 Saint Xavier (Ill.) 2 0 225
11 4 Cumberlands (Ky.) 1 1 203
12 6 Saint Francis (Ind.) 1 1 195
13 7 Missouri Valley 0 1 185
14 20 St. Francis (Ill.) 2 0 179
15 21 Dakota Wesleyan 2 0 148
16 14 Ottawa (Kan.) 1 1 141
17 11 Benedictine (Kan.) 1 1 133
18 13 Northwestern (Iowa) 1 1 86
19 18 Lindsey Wilson (Ky.) 2 1 83
20 NR William Penn (Iowa) 2 1 81
21 25 Cumberland (Tenn.) 1 1 69
22 24 Peru State (Neb.) 1 1 50
23 23 Langston (Okla.) 1 1 44
24 19 Friends (Kan.) 1 1 28
T25 RV Eastern Oregon 1 1 24
T25 17 St. Ambrose (Iowa) 0 1 24
Others Receiving Votes: Oklahoma Baptist 19; Taylor (Ind.) 17; Midland (Neb.) 15; Robert Morris (Ill.)12;Hastings (Neb.) 10; Bacone (Okla.) 9; Kentucky Christian 5; Sterling (Kan.) 3.
September 11, 2014 - 2:39 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRThe Iowa Department of Natural Resources issues a weekly fishing report on Thursdays in an effort to provide the latest information heading into the weekend. The weekly fishing report is compiled from information gathered from local bait shops, angler creel surveys, and county and state parks staff. For more information contact the Spirit Lake fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840.

Northwest

Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)

The dredge machine is in operation on Storm Lake.  Boaters should use caution and stay clear of the dredge machine, booster pump barge, and pipeline.  Channel Catfish – Fair: Catfish have still been biting fairly good.  Use Sonny’s dip bait and fish overcast days to increase chances of success.  White Bass – Fair: No update for white bass this week, but last week shore anglers were picking up white bass with blue and silver 1/4 ounce Kastmasters and Mepps spinners.  Walleye – Fair: Fewer anglers have been out this week, but some walleye are still being caught on crankbaits.  Try #6 Shad Raps and troll the dredge cuts.

Big Spirit Lake

Smallmouth Bass – Fair: Smallmouth should start hitting on jerk baits and trolled crankbaits worked near rock piles. Walleye anglers are likely to come across a few of these hard fighters.  Crappie – Fair: Anglers fishing from piers and docks as well as by boat near bull rush beds have been picking up a few small crappies using small jigs with plastic twister tails. Slip bobbers with a hook tipped with a small shiner should also work for folks.  Yellow Perch – Fair: Anglers are starting to get into a bunch of six-inch perch in the past week or so. Very few are angler acceptable size yet, but folks are having fun with them until they grow up a bit more.  Walleye – Fair: Cooler daytime and overnight temperatures have started to drop the water temperature on Big Spirit. This shift has started to get fish more active. Recent anglers pulling crank baits near weed lines and across rocky points have been pulling a number of nice walleyes. The catch is still dominated by slot fish but a few keepers and lots of fun fishing is in store for folks hitting the water.

East Okoboji Lake

Channel Catfish – Good: Cut bait, chicken livers, and stink bait presented in the evenings and overnight hours is producing a number of nice aggressive catfish for anglers.  Bluegill – Fair: Small ice jigs tipped with red worms or other live bait when presented near weed lines is producing some angler acceptable fish right now. Early morning seems to be when most folks are fishing these spots.  Yellow Perch – Good: Pilkies tipped with red worms worked near rocky points have been producing a few nice perch. Be prepared to sort some small ones, but anglers can count on keeping some for the freezer. Walleye – Fair: Action has started to pick up in the last week or so with the cooler temperatures in the area. Anglers with the best success are working deeper areas with both live bait rigs and deep running crankbaits. Trolling across the deep ends of structure is producing a few nice keepers.  Yellow Bass – Good: Deep weed lines and structures are providing the best action to anglers who use small jigs tipped with live bait.

West Okoboji Lake

Bluegill – Good: Tiny jigs tipped with live bait have been producing a few keepers when worked near the edges of weed beds. The bite seems to be best at first light.  Smallmouth Bass – Fair: The cooler temperatures should have smallmouth moving around rocky points. Troll crank baits or cast jerk baits to target these fish. Yellow Perch – Fair: Fishing has slowed a bit but a few perch are still being harvested. Smaller fish need to be sorted out, but red worms tipping a pilkie have been producing some nice action for anglers. Walleye – Fair: Cooler temperatures have fish a bit more active. Live bait and crankbaits are producing a few keepers around the rocky points. First/last light seem to be doing the best for anglers.  Yellow Bass – Good: Small jigs tipped with wigglers will get you some nice action.

September 4, 2014 - 2:45 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRThe Iowa Department of Natural Resources issues a weekly fishing report on Thursdays in an effort to provide the latest information heading into the weekend. The weekly fishing report is compiled from information gathered from local bait shops, angler creel surveys, and county and state parks staff. For more information contact the Spirit Lake fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840.

Northwest

Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)

The dredge machine is in operation on Storm Lake.  Boaters should use caution and stay clear of the dredge machine, booster pump barge, and pipeline.  Channel Catfish – Fair: Catfishing has been hit or miss.  Use Sonny’s dip bait and fish overcast days to increase chances of success.  White Bass – Fair: Shore anglers have been picking up white bass with blue and silver 1/4 ounce Kastmasters and Mepps spinners.  Some walleye are picked up while fishing for the white bass too.  Walleye – Fair: Anglers have been catching decent numbers of slot fish and even some over the slot.  Try trolling salmo hornet crankbaits or #6 shad raps around the dredge cuts.  The dredge cut between Stoney Point and the big island has been the best.  Early morning is the best time to go with the bite dropping off around mid morning.

Big Spirit Lake

Northern Pike – Fair: Anglers using spinner baits near weed edges have been catching a few harvestable size fish.  Crappie – Fair: Anglers fishing from piers and docks as well as by boat near bull rush beds have been picking up a few small crappies using small jigs with plastic twister tails.  Walleye – Slow: Cooler daytime and overnight temperatures have started to drop the water temperature on Big Spirit. This shift should start to get fish more active. Anglers hoping to target fall mode walleyes should use live bait jigged or drifted near rocky points in the early morning and evening hours.

East Okoboji Lake

Channel Catfish – Good: Cut bait, chicken livers, and stink bait presented in the evenings and overnight hours is producing a number of nice aggressive catfish for anglers.  Bluegill – Fair: Small ice jigs tipped with red worms or other live bait when presented near weed lines is producing some angler acceptable fish right now. Early morning seems to be when most folks are fishing these spots.  Yellow Perch – Good: Pilkies tipped with red worms worked near rocky points have been producing a few nice perch. Be prepared to sort some small ones, but anglers can count on keeping some for the freezer.  Walleye – Fair: Action has started to pick up in the last week or so with the cooler temperatures in the area. Anglers with the best success are working deeper areas with both live bait rigs and deep running crank baits. Trolling across the deep ends of structure is producing a few nice keepers. Make sure to slow your presentation way down when using live bait, fish have been hitting very softly.  Yellow Bass – Good: Deep weed lines and structures are providing the best action to anglers who use small jigs tipped with live bait.

West Okoboji Lake

Bluegill – Good: Tiny jigs tipped with live bait have been producing a few keepers when worked near the edges of weed beds. The bite seems to be best at first light.  Yellow Perch – Good: Smaller fish need to be sorted out, but red worms tipping a pilkie have been producing some nice action for anglers.  Walleye – Fair: Cooler temperatures have fish a bit more active. Live bait and crankbaits are producing a few keepers around the rocky points. First/last light seem to be doing the best for anglers.  Yellow Bass – Good: Small jigs tipped with wigglers will get you some nice action.

August 28, 2014 - 2:40 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRThe Iowa Department of Natural Resources issues a weekly fishing report on Thursdays in an effort to provide the latest information heading into the weekend. The weekly fishing report is compiled from information gathered from local bait shops, angler creel surveys, and county and state parks staff. For more information contact the Spirit Lake fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840.

Northwest

Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)

The dredge machine is in operation on Storm Lake.  Boaters should use caution and stay clear of the dredge machine, booster pump barge, and pipeline.  Channel Catfish – Fair: Try shrimp, dip bait or cut bait.  Walleye – Fair: Some keepers and slot fish are being caught trolling cranks.

Big Spirit Lake

Northern Pike – Fair: Anglers using spinner baits near weed edges have been catching a few harvestable size fish.  Largemouth Bass – Fair: Soft plastics and spinner baits worked near vertical structures should produce a few decent bass right now.  Walleye – Slow: Harvest has been slow but a few anglers are having good success with live bait presented VERY slowly. Let the action of your leech or shiner bring in the fish, don’t be drag racing them around the lake.

East Okoboji Lake

Channel Catfish – Good: Cut bait, chicken livers, and stink bait presented in the evenings and overnight hours is producing a number of nice aggressive catfish for anglers. Bluegill – Fair: Small ice jigs tipped with red worms or other live bait when presented near weed lines is producing some angler acceptable fish right now. Early morning seems to be when most folks are fishing these spots.  Yellow Perch – Fair: Pilkies tipped with red worms worked near rocky points have been producing a few nice perch. Be prepared to sort some small ones, but anglers can count on keeping some for the freezer.  Walleye – Fair: Anglers with the best success are working deeper areas with both live bait rigs and deep running crank baits. Trolling across the deep ends of structure is producing a few nice keepers. Make sure to slow your presentation way down when using live bait, fish have been hitting very softly.  Yellow Bass – Good: Deep weed lines and structures are providing the best action to anglers who use small jigs tipped with live bait.

West Okoboji Lake

Bluegill – Good: Tiny jigs tipped with live bait have been producing a few keepers when worked near the edges of weed beds. The bite seems to be best at first light.  Yellow Perch – Good: Smaller fish need to be sorted out, but red worms tipping a pilkie have been producing some nice action for anglers.  Walleye – Fair: A few walleyes are being harvested from rocky points using leeches and crawler rigs presented slowly. Lots of folks have been fishing these areas at first light until 9 a.m. or so.  Yellow Bass – Good: Small jigs tipped with wigglers will get you some nice action.

August 21, 2014 - 3:27 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRThe Iowa Department of Natural Resources issues a weekly fishing report on Thursdays in an effort to provide the latest information heading into the weekend. The weekly fishing report is compiled from information gathered from local bait shops, angler creel surveys, and county and state parks staff. For more information contact the Spirit Lake fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840.

Northwest

Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)

The dredge machine is in operation on Storm Lake.  Boaters should use caution and stay clear of the dredge machine, booster pump barge, and pipeline.  Channel Catfish – Fair: Try shrimp, dip bait, or cut bait. Walleye – Fair: Some keepers and slot fish are being caught trolling cranks.

Big Spirit Lake

Northern Pike – Fair: Anglers using spinner baits near weed edges have been catching a few harvestable size fish.  Largemouth Bass – Fair: Soft plastics and spinner baits worked near vertical structures should produce a few decent bass right now.  Walleye – Slow: The best action has been on live bait presented very slowly near weed lines and rocky points. Overnight anglers using leeches under a lighted slip bobber have been finding a few 16 inchers shallow.  Muskellunge – Good: Quite a few nice muskies have been caught on Big Spirit the past couple weeks.

East Okoboji Lake

Channel Catfish – Good: Cut bait, chicken livers, and stink bait presented in the evenings and overnight is producing a number of nice aggressive catfish. Bluegill – Fair: Small ice jigs tipped with red worms or other live bait when presented near weed lines is producing some angler acceptable fish. Early morning seems to be when most are fishing these spots.  Yellow Perch – Fair: Pilkies tipped with red worms worked near rocky points have been producing a few nice perch. Be prepared to sort some small ones, but anglers can count on keeping some for the freezer.  Walleye – Fair: Anglers with the best success are working deeper areas with both live bait rigs and deep running crankbaits. Trolling across the deep ends of structure is producing a few nice keepers.  Yellow Bass – Good: Deep weed lines and structures are providing the best action to anglers who use small jigs tipped with live bait.

West Okoboji Lake

Bluegill – Good: Tiny jigs tipped with live bait have been producing a few keepers when worked near the edges of weed beds. The bite seems to be best at first light.  Yellow Perch – Good: Fishing has slowed a little bit but anglers are still catching quite a few perch by working deep weed lines and rocky structures with live bait.  Walleye – Fair: A few walleyes are being harvested from rocky points using leeches and crawler rigs presented slowly. Lots of folks have been fishing these areas at first light until 9 a.m. or so.  Yellow Bass – Good: Small jigs tipped with wigglers will get you some nice action.

August 19, 2014 - 12:10 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRLast year Iowa had six treestand falls, all resulting in personal injury. Tree stand incidents are one of the leading causes of injury to hunters. The DNR urges hunters to utilize the following safety tips:

· National studies show that up to 30 percent of hunters that use a treestand without using/wearing the proper safety equipment will fall during their lifetime.

· Always wear a safety harness, also known as a fall arrest system, when you are in a tree stand, as well as when climbing into or out of a tree stand. 1 in 2 treestand users do not use a fall arrest device.

· 86 percent of treestand incidents occur while climbing in and out of a stand

· A safety strap should be attached to the tree to prevent you from falling more than 12 inches.

· Always inspect the safety harness for signs of wear or damage before each use.

· Follow all manufactures’ instructions for use of a safety harness and stand.

· Follow the three point rule of tree stand safety. Always have three points of contact to the steps or ladder before moving. This could be two arms and one leg holding and stepping on the ladder or one arm and two legs in contact with the ladder before moving. Be cautious that rain, frost, ice, or snow can cause steps to become extremely slippery. Check the security of the step before placing your weight on it.

· Always hunt with a plan and if possible a buddy. Before you leave home, let others know your exact hunting location, when you plan to return and who is with you.

· Always carry emergency signal devices such as a cell phone, walkie-talkie, whistle, signal flare, PLD (personal locator device) and flashlight on your person at all times and within reach even while you are suspended in your FAS. Watch for changing weather conditions. In the event of an incident, remain calm and seek help immediately.

· Always select the proper tree for use with your tree stand. Select a live straight tree that fits within the size limits recommended in your tree stand’s instructions. Do not climb or place a tree stand against a leaning tree.

· Never leave a tree stand installed for more than two weeks since damage could result from changing weather conditions and/or from other factors not obvious with a visual inspection.

· Always use a haul line to pull up your gear and unloaded firearm or bow to your tree stand once you have reached your desired hunting height. Never climb with anything in your hands or on your back. Prior to descending, lower your equipment on the opposite side of the tree.

· Always know your physical limitations. Don’t take chances. Do not climb when using drugs, alcohol or if you’re sick or un-rested. If you start thinking about how high you are, don’t go any higher.

· For more treestand safety tips visit: http://www.tmastands.com/_safety.html

August 19, 2014 - 12:05 pm - Posted in Sports

Iowa DNRIt was not hard to see why the mourning dove is the most populous game bird in North America. As we bounced through the picked field, 30 or 40 lifted off ahead of us and to the sides; winging away from the millet-baited wire traps that held seven or eight less wary doves.

Yet, this handful of birds and a few more in the next set of wire live traps would bring the DNR wildlife crew from Otter Creek Wildlife Area in Tama County to their banding goal of 100. And over the next day, they would fit another 80 with tiny aluminum leg bands, to pad their quota. “You never catch them all. There are so many doves and we’ll catch only a small percentage,” explained wildlife technician Rodney Ellingson.

Setups across Iowa in August yield similar results…where 2,000 banded doves is the goal for this summer. Since 2003, 18,000 doves have been banded and released in Iowa. As any are harvested or recaptured, those bands tell wildlife biologists a lot about where the birds nest, age structure, their migration habits and just how many mourning doves are out there.

Even in mid-August, doves were on the move.

“We see a lot more birds. We know some are local, some are early migrants,” noted Ellingson. “Yesterday, we had some (already banded) recaptures; probably from the northern part of the state. They are definitely on the move; after a few cooler nights.”

That is what hunters want to see, with Iowa’s dove season opening September 1. The state’s newest season, hunters are still ‘trickling’ into the dove fields; as more learn how to hunt the elusive, fast moving game bird.

“An estimated 8,200 dove hunters harvested about 118,000 doves in 2013,” said DNR upland wildlife research biologist Todd Bogenschutz. “Band return data shows hunters harvest about 2 percent of Iowa’s doves.  The population has remained stable here over the last decade.”

Regionally, the 2013 estimated dove population in the Central Management Unit was 141 million.

Scouting is important for successful dove hunting. Many of the better areas are along food plots on public hunting areas and on private fields enrolled in IHAP—Iowa’s Hunter Access Program. Sunflowers have proven most popular in the first three seasons.  Contact the area wildlife biologist for locations of dove plots.  Observations by field staff indicate an abundance of doves this fall.  Visit http://www.iowadnr.gov/Hunting/MigratoryGameBirds/MourningDoves.aspx for more information.

Iowa’s mourning dove season runs through November 9, 2014.  The daily bag limit is 15 doves (Mourning and Eurasian Collared combined) with a possession limit of 30.  Shooting hours are half hour before sunrise to sunset.  Dove hunters are required to register with the federal Harvest Information Program (HIP). Hunters can register with HIP online or thru any license agent.  Go to http://www.iowadnr.gov/Portals/idnr/uploads/Hunting/migratoryregs.pdf for information.

Non-toxic shot is not required for dove hunting except on areas requiring it be used.  A list of public areas requiring non-toxic shot for doves is in the 2014-15 hunting regulations (p. 17) http://www.iowadnr.gov/Hunting/HuntingLicensesLaws.aspx